Quilt Categories and Terms

A quilt can be entered in only one category. It is your choice which category to enter the quilt in. Please read the following information carefully to help with your decision. The category helps Maine Quilts determine where your quilt will be displayed in the show. You may enter a total of four quilts.

Quilt Categories

“From Needle to Needle” Challenge

The theme selected for Maine Quilts 2020, “From Needle to Needle”, is sponsored by The Fabric Garden in Madison. The options are endless. There are pine needles and sewing needles but how to put them together, or not. That’s where the creativity comes in. A commemorative pin will be awarded to each entrant in the challenge. Limit of one quilt in this category per person. 

“Duck, Duck, Goose” Challenge

The theme selected for Maine Quilts 2021, “Duck, Duck, Goose”, is sponsored by The Fabric Garden in Madison. Your quilt might be an interpretation of the childhood game…or perhaps a duck chasing a goose. It can be whatever you want it to be. A commemorative pin will be awarded to each entrant in the challenge. Limit of one quilt in this category per person.

Art – A broad range of visual arts: painting, printmaking, photography, graphic design, etc.

Modern – Primarily functional and inspired by modern design. Characteristics may include minimalism, asymmetry, expansive negative space, bold colors and prints, and/or improvisational piecing.

General Exhibit Appliqué – Quilts that are more than 75% appliquéd.

General Exhibit Pieced – Quilts that are more than 75% pieced.

General Exhibit Mixed – Quilts that have an even balance of pieced and appliquéd elements.

General Exhibit Other – Quilts that do not fit into any other category. Examples include whole cloth, crazy quilt, redwork, embroidered, stenciled, painted, cathedral window, leather, etc. Quilts in this category may be either tied or quilted.

Terms

Original – First, new creation. Not a copy of a previous work. Patterns and/or works by others are not used.

Traditional – “Quilts made using designs which are in the public domain and passed down from generation to generation” (from Worth Doing Twice: Creating Quilts from Old Tops by Patricia J. Morris and Jeannette Toulsey Muir). No published patterns or kits may be used.